Desirée Valadares

Assistant Professor | Starting July 2022

Research Area

Education

PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley
M.Arch, McGill University
MLA, University of Guelph
B.Arts Sc., McMaster University

About

Joining UBC Geography in July 2022

My research and teaching focus on territoriality, occupation and empire in Canada and the non-contiguous US.

In my current project, I study transpacific social (redress) movements and subsequent calls for the preservation / conservation of Second World War sites in Hawai’i, Alaska and British Columbia. I rely on field-based, archival research methods and work alongside heritage professionals, community organizations and other interested groups.

This project frames histories of colonization, western imperialism, and militarism in Asia-Pacific and the Arctic as interconnected struggles and reveals how these dynamics shape Asian migrant and Indigenous relationships to land in North America. I argue for a new heritage politics attuned to competing and overlapping Asian settler war memories of unjust incarceration and unresolved Indigenous (Pacific Islander, Alaska Native and Coast Salish) land claims.

I am trained as a landscape architect and architectural historian. I remain active in debates on land use and heritage conservation policy in Canada and the US.

Currently, I serve on the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects (CSLA) Cultural and Historic Landscapes Committee and ICOMOS Canada’s (International Council on Monuments and Sites) Heritage Policy Standing Committee.

Previously, I worked as an intern landscape architect in Toronto and Edinburgh. More recently, I worked in San Francisco, Honolulu, Sitka/ Juneau, and Washington D.C on projects related to historic preservation, racial/ethnic minority and Indigenous histories, and community memory.


Desirée Valadares

Assistant Professor | Starting July 2022
email

PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley
M.Arch, McGill University
MLA, University of Guelph
B.Arts Sc., McMaster University

Joining UBC Geography in July 2022

My research and teaching focus on territoriality, occupation and empire in Canada and the non-contiguous US.

In my current project, I study transpacific social (redress) movements and subsequent calls for the preservation / conservation of Second World War sites in Hawai'i, Alaska and British Columbia. I rely on field-based, archival research methods and work alongside heritage professionals, community organizations and other interested groups.

This project frames histories of colonization, western imperialism, and militarism in Asia-Pacific and the Arctic as interconnected struggles and reveals how these dynamics shape Asian migrant and Indigenous relationships to land in North America. I argue for a new heritage politics attuned to competing and overlapping Asian settler war memories of unjust incarceration and unresolved Indigenous (Pacific Islander, Alaska Native and Coast Salish) land claims.

I am trained as a landscape architect and architectural historian. I remain active in debates on land use and heritage conservation policy in Canada and the US.

Currently, I serve on the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects (CSLA) Cultural and Historic Landscapes Committee and ICOMOS Canada's (International Council on Monuments and Sites) Heritage Policy Standing Committee.

Previously, I worked as an intern landscape architect in Toronto and Edinburgh. More recently, I worked in San Francisco, Honolulu, Sitka/ Juneau, and Washington D.C on projects related to historic preservation, racial/ethnic minority and Indigenous histories, and community memory.

Desirée Valadares

Assistant Professor | Starting July 2022
email

PhD Candidate, UC Berkeley
M.Arch, McGill University
MLA, University of Guelph
B.Arts Sc., McMaster University

Joining UBC Geography in July 2022

My research and teaching focus on territoriality, occupation and empire in Canada and the non-contiguous US.

In my current project, I study transpacific social (redress) movements and subsequent calls for the preservation / conservation of Second World War sites in Hawai'i, Alaska and British Columbia. I rely on field-based, archival research methods and work alongside heritage professionals, community organizations and other interested groups.

This project frames histories of colonization, western imperialism, and militarism in Asia-Pacific and the Arctic as interconnected struggles and reveals how these dynamics shape Asian migrant and Indigenous relationships to land in North America. I argue for a new heritage politics attuned to competing and overlapping Asian settler war memories of unjust incarceration and unresolved Indigenous (Pacific Islander, Alaska Native and Coast Salish) land claims.

I am trained as a landscape architect and architectural historian. I remain active in debates on land use and heritage conservation policy in Canada and the US.

Currently, I serve on the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects (CSLA) Cultural and Historic Landscapes Committee and ICOMOS Canada's (International Council on Monuments and Sites) Heritage Policy Standing Committee.

Previously, I worked as an intern landscape architect in Toronto and Edinburgh. More recently, I worked in San Francisco, Honolulu, Sitka/ Juneau, and Washington D.C on projects related to historic preservation, racial/ethnic minority and Indigenous histories, and community memory.