ON LEAVE
Until June 30, 2023

Jessica Wang

Professor
location_on GEOG 140E
Education

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995, PhD
Cornell University, 1988, BA


About

Cross-appointed to the Department of History

My research addresses the historical entanglements between science, knowledge, and power. I am currently exploring the interplay between biogeography and the spatiality of state and society through the study of agriculture and the biological management of colonial spaces within the U.S. insular empire of the early twentieth century.

A wide range of other projects—on science, cold war ideology, and nuclear age politics in the United States; social science and state power during the New Deal era; the social history of rabies in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century New York City; and the fraught interconnections between scientific and social knowledge, state power, internationalism, and colonialism–have produced this now-ongoing preoccupation with botany and entomology, agriculture, and the history of U.S. empire.

Questions of scale also inform my interests in human experience and interactions with the natural world, whether at the level of the interior space of the scientific self, the everyday social experience of the street, urban governance, national level policymaking, or the place of the United States within a global order.

I joined the UBC Department of History as an Associate Professor in 2006. More recently, my growing concerns with the spatial and material dimensions of science, environment, and state power have led me to the Department of Geography.

For a more extensive description of my past work and a list of my major publications from the 1990s to the present, please consult the UBC Department of History website.


Teaching


Publications

2022

WANG,  J. 2022. Knowledge, State Power, and the Invention of International Science. In Knowledge Flows in a Global Age: A Transnational Approach, edited by J. Krige, 31 – 73. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

2021

WANG,  J.  2021. Agricultural Expertise, Race, and Economic Development: Small Producer Ideology and Settler Colonialism in the Territory of Hawaii, 1900-1917. History and Technology 36 (3-4): 310-336. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2020.1859775

2019

Wang, J. 2019. Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers: Rabies, Medicine, and Society in an American Metropolis, 1840-1920. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press.

WANG, J. 2019. Plants, Insects, and the Biological Management of American Empire: Tropical Agriculture in Early Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i. History and Technology 35 (3): 203- 236. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680143

JANSEN, A., J. KRIGE., and J. WANG. 2019. Empires of Knowledge: Constructing Global Order in the Twentieth Century. History and Technology 35 (3): 195-363. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680141

WANG, J. 2019. Looking Forward in a Failing World: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., the United States, and Global Order in the Interwar Years. Seattle University Law Review 42 (2): 385-416.

2017

WANG, J. 2017. Broken Symmetry’: Physics, Aesthetics, and Moral Virtue in Nuclear Age America. In Epistemic Virtues: Towards an Integrated History of the Sciences and the Humanities, edited by H. J. Paul and J. van Dongen, 27- 47. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.


Awards

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, 2018-19

Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Faculty Research Fellowship, UBC/Killam Trusts, 2016-17

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, Spring 2012


Jessica Wang

Professor
location_on GEOG 140E
Education

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995, PhD
Cornell University, 1988, BA

ON LEAVE
Until June 30, 2023

About

Cross-appointed to the Department of History

My research addresses the historical entanglements between science, knowledge, and power. I am currently exploring the interplay between biogeography and the spatiality of state and society through the study of agriculture and the biological management of colonial spaces within the U.S. insular empire of the early twentieth century.

A wide range of other projects—on science, cold war ideology, and nuclear age politics in the United States; social science and state power during the New Deal era; the social history of rabies in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century New York City; and the fraught interconnections between scientific and social knowledge, state power, internationalism, and colonialism–have produced this now-ongoing preoccupation with botany and entomology, agriculture, and the history of U.S. empire.

Questions of scale also inform my interests in human experience and interactions with the natural world, whether at the level of the interior space of the scientific self, the everyday social experience of the street, urban governance, national level policymaking, or the place of the United States within a global order.

I joined the UBC Department of History as an Associate Professor in 2006. More recently, my growing concerns with the spatial and material dimensions of science, environment, and state power have led me to the Department of Geography.

For a more extensive description of my past work and a list of my major publications from the 1990s to the present, please consult the UBC Department of History website.


Teaching


Publications

2022

WANG,  J. 2022. Knowledge, State Power, and the Invention of International Science. In Knowledge Flows in a Global Age: A Transnational Approach, edited by J. Krige, 31 – 73. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

2021

WANG,  J.  2021. Agricultural Expertise, Race, and Economic Development: Small Producer Ideology and Settler Colonialism in the Territory of Hawaii, 1900-1917. History and Technology 36 (3-4): 310-336. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2020.1859775

2019

Wang, J. 2019. Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers: Rabies, Medicine, and Society in an American Metropolis, 1840-1920. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press.

WANG, J. 2019. Plants, Insects, and the Biological Management of American Empire: Tropical Agriculture in Early Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i. History and Technology 35 (3): 203- 236. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680143

JANSEN, A., J. KRIGE., and J. WANG. 2019. Empires of Knowledge: Constructing Global Order in the Twentieth Century. History and Technology 35 (3): 195-363. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680141

WANG, J. 2019. Looking Forward in a Failing World: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., the United States, and Global Order in the Interwar Years. Seattle University Law Review 42 (2): 385-416.

2017

WANG, J. 2017. Broken Symmetry’: Physics, Aesthetics, and Moral Virtue in Nuclear Age America. In Epistemic Virtues: Towards an Integrated History of the Sciences and the Humanities, edited by H. J. Paul and J. van Dongen, 27- 47. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.


Awards

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, 2018-19

Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Faculty Research Fellowship, UBC/Killam Trusts, 2016-17

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, Spring 2012


Jessica Wang

Professor
ON LEAVE
Until June 30, 2023
location_on GEOG 140E
Education

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995, PhD
Cornell University, 1988, BA

Cross-appointed to the Department of History

My research addresses the historical entanglements between science, knowledge, and power. I am currently exploring the interplay between biogeography and the spatiality of state and society through the study of agriculture and the biological management of colonial spaces within the U.S. insular empire of the early twentieth century.

A wide range of other projects—on science, cold war ideology, and nuclear age politics in the United States; social science and state power during the New Deal era; the social history of rabies in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century New York City; and the fraught interconnections between scientific and social knowledge, state power, internationalism, and colonialism–have produced this now-ongoing preoccupation with botany and entomology, agriculture, and the history of U.S. empire.

Questions of scale also inform my interests in human experience and interactions with the natural world, whether at the level of the interior space of the scientific self, the everyday social experience of the street, urban governance, national level policymaking, or the place of the United States within a global order.

I joined the UBC Department of History as an Associate Professor in 2006. More recently, my growing concerns with the spatial and material dimensions of science, environment, and state power have led me to the Department of Geography.

For a more extensive description of my past work and a list of my major publications from the 1990s to the present, please consult the UBC Department of History website.

2022

WANG,  J. 2022. Knowledge, State Power, and the Invention of International Science. In Knowledge Flows in a Global Age: A Transnational Approach, edited by J. Krige, 31 – 73. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.

2021

WANG,  J.  2021. Agricultural Expertise, Race, and Economic Development: Small Producer Ideology and Settler Colonialism in the Territory of Hawaii, 1900-1917. History and Technology 36 (3-4): 310-336. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2020.1859775

2019

Wang, J. 2019. Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers: Rabies, Medicine, and Society in an American Metropolis, 1840-1920. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press.

WANG, J. 2019. Plants, Insects, and the Biological Management of American Empire: Tropical Agriculture in Early Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i. History and Technology 35 (3): 203- 236. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680143

JANSEN, A., J. KRIGE., and J. WANG. 2019. Empires of Knowledge: Constructing Global Order in the Twentieth Century. History and Technology 35 (3): 195-363. https://doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2019.1680141

WANG, J. 2019. Looking Forward in a Failing World: Adolf A. Berle, Jr., the United States, and Global Order in the Interwar Years. Seattle University Law Review 42 (2): 385-416.

2017

WANG, J. 2017. Broken Symmetry’: Physics, Aesthetics, and Moral Virtue in Nuclear Age America. In Epistemic Virtues: Towards an Integrated History of the Sciences and the Humanities, edited by H. J. Paul and J. van Dongen, 27- 47. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, 2018-19

Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Faculty Research Fellowship, UBC/Killam Trusts, 2016-17

Faculty Fellow, Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, Harvard University, Spring 2012