About

Pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree

Research Area: Political and Economic Geography

Supervisors: Jamie Peck and Trevor Barnes

Degrees: MSc Migration Studies (distinction, Oxford University); MA International Relations (first class honours, University of St Andrews).

Entry Date: 2019

Expected Graduation Date: 2023

Research Statement:

My PhD research focuses on “just transition” policies in Scotland and New Zealand. The project is split between two main approaches (1) chronicling the histories of oil in Scotland and New Zealand since the mid-twentieth century; and (2) mapping Scotland and New Zealand’s “Wellbeing Economy Alliance” and the politics of the just transition. The just transition is intended to ensure communities and workers are not left behind in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems through community dialogue and long-term planning including skills retraining for the green economy. Both nations have regions that are “dependent” on fossil fuel economies – Aberdeen in Scotland, “Europe’s oil capital,” and Taranaki, New Zealand’s primary oil region. Methodologically, I conduct archival research, policy analysis, oral histories, and interviews with key stakeholders.

I am a UBC Public Scholar and host a monthly radio show on B-Side Radio at the Beaumont Studios in Vancouver. I also give guest lectures on the concept and methodology of Rhythmanalysis which focuses on the importance of sound and rhythms to understanding space.

Previous Research (full list of publications on academia.edu page).

Co-founder and former editor at Routed Magazine: https://www.routedmagazine.com

Cohen, M. (2018), “The Politics of Population and Migration in a Stateless Nation”, Master’s Dissertation, MSc Migration Studies, Oxford Social Science Library, Oxford University.

Cohen, M. (2018) “Militarisation, Memorialisation & Multiculture: British Muslims and the 2014 Centenary Commemorations of World War One in Britain”, Contemporary Voices: The St Andrews Journal of International Relations, Vol 1, Issue 1, pp. 50-77.


Pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree

Research Area: Political and Economic Geography

Supervisors: Jamie Peck and Trevor Barnes

Degrees: MSc Migration Studies (distinction, Oxford University); MA International Relations (first class honours, University of St Andrews).

Entry Date: 2019

Expected Graduation Date: 2023

Research Statement:

My PhD research focuses on “just transition” policies in Scotland and New Zealand. The project is split between two main approaches (1) chronicling the histories of oil in Scotland and New Zealand since the mid-twentieth century; and (2) mapping Scotland and New Zealand’s “Wellbeing Economy Alliance” and the politics of the just transition. The just transition is intended to ensure communities and workers are not left behind in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems through community dialogue and long-term planning including skills retraining for the green economy. Both nations have regions that are “dependent” on fossil fuel economies - Aberdeen in Scotland, “Europe's oil capital,” and Taranaki, New Zealand’s primary oil region. Methodologically, I conduct archival research, policy analysis, oral histories, and interviews with key stakeholders.

I am a UBC Public Scholar and host a monthly radio show on B-Side Radio at the Beaumont Studios in Vancouver. I also give guest lectures on the concept and methodology of Rhythmanalysis which focuses on the importance of sound and rhythms to understanding space.

Previous Research (full list of publications on academia.edu page).

Co-founder and former editor at Routed Magazine: https://www.routedmagazine.com

Cohen, M. (2018), “The Politics of Population and Migration in a Stateless Nation”, Master's Dissertation, MSc Migration Studies, Oxford Social Science Library, Oxford University.

Cohen, M. (2018) “Militarisation, Memorialisation & Multiculture: British Muslims and the 2014 Centenary Commemorations of World War One in Britain”, Contemporary Voices: The St Andrews Journal of International Relations, Vol 1, Issue 1, pp. 50-77.

Pursuing a doctor of philosophy degree

Research Area: Political and Economic Geography

Supervisors: Jamie Peck and Trevor Barnes

Degrees: MSc Migration Studies (distinction, Oxford University); MA International Relations (first class honours, University of St Andrews).

Entry Date: 2019

Expected Graduation Date: 2023

Research Statement:

My PhD research focuses on “just transition” policies in Scotland and New Zealand. The project is split between two main approaches (1) chronicling the histories of oil in Scotland and New Zealand since the mid-twentieth century; and (2) mapping Scotland and New Zealand’s “Wellbeing Economy Alliance” and the politics of the just transition. The just transition is intended to ensure communities and workers are not left behind in the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems through community dialogue and long-term planning including skills retraining for the green economy. Both nations have regions that are “dependent” on fossil fuel economies - Aberdeen in Scotland, “Europe's oil capital,” and Taranaki, New Zealand’s primary oil region. Methodologically, I conduct archival research, policy analysis, oral histories, and interviews with key stakeholders.

I am a UBC Public Scholar and host a monthly radio show on B-Side Radio at the Beaumont Studios in Vancouver. I also give guest lectures on the concept and methodology of Rhythmanalysis which focuses on the importance of sound and rhythms to understanding space.

Previous Research (full list of publications on academia.edu page).

Co-founder and former editor at Routed Magazine: https://www.routedmagazine.com

Cohen, M. (2018), “The Politics of Population and Migration in a Stateless Nation”, Master's Dissertation, MSc Migration Studies, Oxford Social Science Library, Oxford University.

Cohen, M. (2018) “Militarisation, Memorialisation & Multiculture: British Muslims and the 2014 Centenary Commemorations of World War One in Britain”, Contemporary Voices: The St Andrews Journal of International Relations, Vol 1, Issue 1, pp. 50-77.